Why Girls Join Violent Groups: An Update On My New Book

My new book addresses the girls and women, who join violent groups. In the book, you will learn about the girls in Colorado, an unlikely place for terrorist recruitment, and the women of Iraq–the untold story of the youngest would-be suicide bomber from an inside source. And so much more. Stay tuned for order details.

 

The threat is real. We live in an unsafe world, haunted by criminals, gangs, serial killers, murderers, rapists, and religious extremists. The latter is relatively new and has troubled me for nearly 20 years. As an American Muslim woman, I’ve been asked over and over again “why” and “how” ordinary-looking Muslims join violent groups.

The truth is that the majority of Muslims are kind, compassionate, heart-felt, and merciful. They are not killers.

But there is another reality which lurks in the darkness. And they are the crazy fringe minority, who have made enough noise online, taking innocent lives offline, and despite their ugliness, they are still recruiting. Even as I write this. 

The book I have written is not just another book on “radical” Islam or “the struggle within Islam” but offers the reader an intimate look at the women in Islam, a subject I study, lecture on, and feel passionate about.

Here’s a look inside my next book:

The sound of his voice was heavy.

The leader of the world’s new terror nightmare, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), declared: “Rush oh Muslims to your state. Yes, it is your state. Rush, because Syria is not for the Syrians, and Iraq is not for the Iraqis. The Earth belongs to Allah!” Draped in black, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi stood at the pulpit of the Great Mosque of al-Nuri in the Iraqi city of Mosul to separate the world into two: the believers (i.e., the righteous followers of Islam) and the non-believers or the kufr that include “the camp of the Jews, the Crusaders and their allies.”

An old enemy disguised as new, al-Baghdadi made no mention of women.

But his predecessor did.

Abu Mus’ab al-Zarqawi understood that Muslim women could inflict greater damage on his perceived enemies. He reinvented the role for Muslim women by telling them to strap on the bomb; marry an insurgent; recruit other women; and support terrorism by being a facilitator, messenger, logistics provider and much more. When he was alive, more than fifty Muslim women, including converts from the West, detonated inside Iraq, striking at U.S. forces and Iraqis from 2003 to 2008.

In 2005, I predicted this dangerous trend. I published my first piece in The Baltimore Sun, warning the international community to expect more deadly divas. 

Stay tuned for the book launch. Coming Soon.

To My Readers: If you have comments or questions, you can always engage me.  Click here to leave me a message.